Paul van de Logt heads the Food and Nutrition Security team in the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs

18 October, 2018

Paul van de Logt: ‘’Complex issues, like food and nutrition security, can only be tackled if we work together: governments, private sector, knowledge institutions and NGOs.’’

Paul van de Logt heads the Food and Nutrition Security team in the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. This team has taken up the responsibility to reduce the number of people in a situation of malnutrition, improve smallholders’ productivity and promote sustainable management of farm land. To achieve these goals the team works in partnership with the private sector, NGO’s, knowledge institutes and public sector partners. One of their programs is the Geodata for Agriculture and Water (G4AW) programme which aims to improve food security in developing countries by using satellite data.

How do you value that the private sector is developing a trajectory, Geodata for Inclusive Finance and Food (G4IFF), in parallel to G4AW? And do you envision future collaboration to scale up the parallel efforts?

 Access to finance is key to increase agricultural production in the global South. Therefore, it is very interesting to see that NpM, Rabobank Foundation, FMO and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation are exploring the use of satellite applications for financial inclusion of smallholder farmers. The G4IFF initiative is a spin-off of the G4AW programme and shows how complex issues, like food and nutrition security, can only be tackled if we work together: governments, private sector, knowledge institutions and NGOs. I am very curious to hear which pilots will come out of the NpM Innovator’s Challenge and I am open to explore future collaboration. In our team – the to you well known - Mariska Lammers is the responsible policy officer for this topic.

What do you see as key success factor in G4AW and G4IFF? 

 The G4AW programme targets 2 result areas of our food and nutrition security policy: increased productivity of farmers and strengthened ecological sustainability of farm land. Because of the innovative nature of the programme, it is crucial to learn from what is happening on the ground and to take a flexible approach. The main lessons learned from 6 years of G4AW can be read here, and are summarized as: 1. Invest in business case development 2. Encourage diverse and locally embedded partnerships and 3. Understand the local context and the end customer, namely the smallholder farmer or pastoralist. I encourage G4IFF to learn from these experiences and to share your knowledge and expertise on financial inclusion with the G4AW projects.

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